I don’t typically post links here to my other writing, but one today fits so well with the spirit of Everyday Asceticism that it could just as easily have appeared here anyway. At Humane Pursuits, I write,

The Benedictines have bequeathed to the world a twofold motto for daily life: ora et labora, pray and work. While some might presume that the ascetic life is about fleeing to a place of contemplation—and, to an extent, it is—they would be mistaken to believe that this flight from “the world” is also a flight from work. The Church fathers, East and West, have a long tradition that affirms the value of human labor. And their reflections on the subject contain depths of insight still relevant for those of us who live in “the world” today, such as how to find meaning in whatever work one may do.

I then focus on a saying from an anonymous old man from the Egyptian desert about how we ought to work not for that which is impermanent, but rather what is “little and lasting.” To find out more, head over to Human Pursuits and read the rest here.

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